Salt Lake City

Economic Development

Phone: (801) 535-7200 | Email: ed@slcgov.com

How to Prepare Your Outdoor Space for Winter

OUTDOOR WINTERIZATION GUIDE

Outdoor dining expansions and relaxed DABC patio restrictions have been a key strategy for restaurants to expand service and alleviate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now that we are faced with colder weather and limited indoor capacity for Salt Lake City restaurants, outdoor expansions are more important than ever.

Salt Lake City is deeply grateful for your service to our economy. We know you are under tremendous pressure right now and we are working to help you navigate the permitting process quickly. Our commitment to you: most temporary projects will have a fast, 2-day review time. We will strive to the best of our ability, given available staff and demand. Longer term projects will have expedited attention to reduce permit turnaround time.

On Dec. 21st Salt Lake City hosted a Outdoor Dining Expansion Webinar to help answer your questions more quickly. Access that webinar here.

Need more assistance? Liesl Limburg is available to help – reach out to her at ed@slcgov.com

FOR TEMPORARY STRUCTURES AND HEATING, CONSIDER:

  • All temporary structures must be erected for less than 180 days.
  • Types of tents – there are flame retardant material requirements and maintenance.
  • What types of structures don’t need permits? What structures do need permits?
  • If a propane or other type of heater is used the temporary structure must have the California State Fire Marshal’s flame retardant certification seal.
  • Lights and heaters plugged into outdoor electrical outlets do not need permits. Cords cannot be run to an indoor outlet. Cords must be designed for outdoor use.
  • Which types of permits you need – temporary outdoor business (right of way) permit, SLC Fire temporary permit, DABC license extensions
  • All customers and staff must adhere to all mandatory Utah Department of Health and DABC standards, applicable laws, and regulations. Please refer to the Utah COVID-19 Transmission Index Guidelines to ensure you are following all requirements.
  • Businesses are responsible for snow removal and maintenance around outdoor dining areas

TEMPORARY STRUCTURES ALLOWED – OVER 200 SQUARE FEET

  • 2 non-adjacent sides open enough to provide air flow through the space.
  • 2 adjacent walls closed and 2 adjacent sides open – *without* a roof. Used for street barrier, wind screen, and privacy.
  • Ceilings, roofs, umbrellas, or canopies with no walls
Types of Temporary Outdoor Structures Allowed in Salt Lake City
  • All tents and membrane structures must be properly secured in case of wind (40 mph basic wind speed and 90 mph 3-second gust).
  • Securing of the structures is the responsibility of the owner/operator
  • A portable fire extinguisher with a minimum 2A10BC rating must be accessible within 75 feet walking distance of all tents/temporary structures, at a minimum, as required by section 906 of the IFC.
  • All extinguishers require a current State Fire Marshal’s inspection tag. Inspection tags are required annually.
  • No smoking signs must be provided in each permitted tent.
  • Exits shall be clearly marked and lighted when the exits serve an occupant load of 50 or more.
  • All compressed gas bottles must be secured at all times to prevent them from tipping over. No compressed gas bottles will be stored within a tent.
  • Generators must be maintained at least 20 feet from any tent or temporary structure.
  • No combustible waste can be stored within 30 feet of a tent or temporary structure.
  • Cords cannot be run to an indoor outlet and must be designed for outdoor use.
  • No heaters with open flames are allowed under any tent or canopy within SLC boundaries.
  • If a propane or other type of heater is used, the tent must have the California State Fire Marshal’s flame retardant certification seal visibly displayed on the tent or canopy.
  • For multiple tents there must be a 12 foot space between each structure.

PERMANENT PATIOS AND STRUCTURES

  • Any permanent structure requires a traditional building permit. Start the process through SLC Building Services.
  • To extend the patio season, businesses need support from the community and help in designing solutions for the challenge ahead. And it’s not just for this winter but quite possibly for another year or more. Permanent installations require a higher level of scrutiny, including zoning, energy codes, occupancy load, fixtures, and more. Expect longer turnarounds for permanent structures. However it is possible to plan both a temporary and permanent solution concurrently.

    WHAT DOES NOT REQUIRE A PERMIT?

    • Use of private property and any tent under 200 sq. ft. erected for less than 180 days
    • Freestanding canopies with a covering of fabric or pliable material 400 sq. ft. or less, open on 3 or more sides are exempt from building permit requirements.
    • Use of any other structure under 120 sq. ft. erected for less than 180 days.
    • Fences or barriers over 5’9” in height

    WHAT REQUIRES A TEMPORARY PERMIT? WHICH PERMITS WILL YOU NEED?

    • All tents over 200 sq ft require an operational permit.
    • If you are using a public right-of-way outdoor space
    • Serving alcohol in public right-of-way
    • Any patio covering or structure that is 120 sq. ft. or more
    • Building-mounted awnings
    • Raised decks
    • Fences or barriers over 5’9” in height
    • Any tent, structure or covering that will stay up for more than 180 days

    Whether you decide to find indoor or outdoor solutions, now is a good time to review the Salt Lake County Requirements for dining while we are in a heightened restriction level. Normal noise restrictions are in place — the health department works with local law enforcement agencies to enforce the county’s noise regulation.

    TEMPORARY OUTDOOR BUSINESS PERMIT

    Who needs it? If you are going to be using the public right-of-way (sidewalks, parking spaces, etc.) to extend outdoor dining.

    APPLY VIA EMAIL: Request an application from Real_Estate@slc.gov

    Application Requirements:

    • Commercial general liability insurance that meets or exceeds minimums set by Salt Lake City
    • Applicants shall provide a scaled site plan drawn to scale with the dimensions of the outdoor business area
    • Applicant must show that 6 feet of distance can be maintained between backs/sides of chairs for each dining group
    • Hand drawn site plans are acceptable
    • Fees: $9/month for 5 tables or less, $11/month for 6 or more tables
    • To get the application, e-mail : Real_Estate@slcgov.com

    General Guidelines:

    • All customers and staff must adhere to all mandatory Utah Department of Health and DABC standards, applicable laws, and regulations.
    • No outdoor business activities shall encroach upon any part of the sidewalk frontage of any adjacent property without written permission from the adjacent property owners or tenants.
    • Outdoor business operators are required to provide commercial general liability insurance that meets or exceeds minimums set by Salt Lake City
    • Anything placed in the right-of-way must be removed at the close of business each day.
    • All temporary business permits expire automatically after 180 days.

    Additional Info:

    • Existing outdoor expansion right-of-way permits may be extended 180 days.
    • If already permitted and seeking an extension through 12/31/2020, send email to: Real_Estate@slcgov.com with updated insurance document, intended site plan with all changes if applicable and request extension.
    • Please refer to the Utah COVID-19 Transmission Index Guidelines to ensure you are following all requirements.

    NEED MORE SPACE? PARKLET OPTIONS

    Parklets are mini-parks, created by replacing 1 or more on-street parking stalls with a deck, planters, café tables, chairs, benches, and artwork.

    The Salt Lake City Planning Division encourages the use of parklet dining areas to enhance the public realm and provide a more generous pedestrian zone with fewer obstructions on the sidewalk.

    By creating a dining area in a parklet, establishments can add approximately 200 to 600 square feet of space for outdoor dining. Despite their small size, parklets can pose complex design and durability challenges.

    COVID-19 SPACING FOR PARKLETS

    Note:The Salt Lake City Planning Division strongly recommends that establishment operators work with a licensed professional designer, such as an architect or landscape architect, to reduce permit processing time and parklet maintenance costs through higher quality design, materials, and project execution.

    PARKLET EXAMPLES

    All parklets are required to have permits from the Salt Lake City Transportation and Engineering Divisions, in addition to a Revocable Permit Agreement made with Salt Lake City Real Estate Services. mystreet@slcgov.com

    TEMPORARY STRUCTURE BUSINESS PERMIT

    Who needs it? If you are using a tent over 200 sq. ft. or another structure over 120 sq. ft. on private property.

    APPLY VIA EMAIL: Request the initial application from Real_Estate@slc.gov

    • All customers and staff must adhere to all mandatory Utah Department of Health and DABC standards, applicable laws, and regulations
    • Please refer to the Utah COVID-19 Transmission Index Guidelines to ensure you are following all requirements.
    • Fees: Temporary Use Permit is $265

    Standards for issuance of a building permit:

    • Temporary Food Service and Other Small Scale Uses are permitted under a Temporary Use Permit for a maximum of 180 days with a tent, canopy, or other temporary structure under 200 square feet.
    • To get the initial application, send a request to e-mail : Real_Estate@slcgov.com
    • All permits must be applied for online through Citizen Access Portal
    • After an application has been submitted the following must be uploaded through ProjectDox for Plan Review. 
      •  A Basic Site Plan including but not limited to:
        • The Proposed Temporary Use.
        • The proposed location of all temporary structures, including the size of the tent, the number of tables, benches and/or chairs, the height and location of any fences or similar barriers, and the location of any heaters, generators and/or extension cords.
        • All Existing Permanent Structures.
        • Existing and Proposed Parking.
        • Indicate if alcohol will be served within the confines of the temporary use.
        • Main entrance location to the principle building.
        • Traffic and other access routes.
        • Ingress and Egress for Emergency Vehicles.
        • Any proposed temporary or permanent energy sources being routed to the proposed Temporary Structure.  This includes but isn’t limited to:
          • Generators
          • Extension Cords
          • Natural Gas or Propane Heating devices
      • Temporary Structures 200 square feet or larger shall obtain Building Code and Fire Code approval as part of the Temporary Use Plan Review.
        • A Structural Analysis Report is required to address wind and snow loads.
      • Temporary Structures 400 square feet require an Operational Permit from Salt Lake City Fire Department prior to issuance of a Temporary Use Permit. 
    • Separate Electrical and Mechanical Permits are required for all permanent and/or temporary electrical or gas connections to the proposed Temporary Use.  Permanent electrical and mechanical connections require a Licensed Contractor.
    • After the permit has been issued, an inspection should be scheduled to verify life safety compliance.
    • A 2nd inspection should be scheduled to verify removal after 180 day period has ended.

    General Requirements:

    • Temporary structures shall be located in a rear or interior side yard only and adjacent to the principle business.
    • Outdoor business activity shall be located a minimum of 10-feet from a property line in a residential zoning district.
    • DABC permits are required for alcohol sales.
    • Fire suppression equipment shall be on-site if any heating is provided or if cooking is to be conducted within the temporary structure.

    Definitions:

    • “Outdoor business activities” is defined as any retail, or restaurant activity, include retail sales, retail services, or outdoor dining, that would typically occur inside a building or structure but is operating outside and adjacent to the anchor business.
    • “Temporary structure” is defined as any tent, freestanding canopy, awning, patio covering or similar structures.

    TEMPORARY CORONAVIRUS FIRE PERMIT

    Who needs it?

    Any tent with one or more sides over 400 sq. ft., or

    Temporary structures that are open on all sides over 700 sq. ft.

    No heaters with open flames are allowed within any temporary structure within SLC boundaries.

    Cooking tents will not be allowed with the temporary coronavirus tent permit.

    To avoid the permit requirement on multiple tents there must be a 12 foot space every 400 to 700 sq. ft.

    APPLY HERE: aca.slcfire.com

    Definition of a Temporary Coronavirus Tent and Canopy (membrane structures)

    • Tent: A structure, enclosure or shelter, with or without sidewalls or drops, constructed of fabric or pliable material supported by any manner except by air or the contents that it protects.

    Permitting process:

    • All tents and other membrane structures shall comply with Chapter 31 of the 2018 International Fire Code.
    • Apply for the permit thirty (14) days prior to tent, stage canopy set up.
    • Fees: An Operational Fire Permit is $173 + $1 for each additional temporary structure.
    • Apply for temporary coronavirus tent permit online.  The application will be reviewed for compliance to the fire code and a permit fee will be at the discretion of the Fire Marshal. SLC Fire Department will wave this fee, but leave the option to charge if needed.
    • A temporary coronavirus tent permit will be issued upon the physical inspection of the location and structure. A permit issued by the Fire Marshal will be required for each tent or canopy structure as per the requirements stated above.
    • The temporary coronavirus tent permit application should contain the following:
      • A complete site plan
      • The location of access roads (the Fire Marshal will determine if fire access roads meet fire access requirements)
      • The location of any fire hydrants, and maintain 5’ of clearance around hydrant in all directions
      • The location of any fire department connection (FDC), and maintain 5’ of clearance around FDC in all directions
      • Property lines and the location of nearby structures. Tents or canopy will remain 20’ from structures and property lines.            
        • Any a tent or canopy is within 20’ of a structure or property line will be reviewed on a case by case basis.
        • will be required to maintain a fire watch anytime that the tent, canopy, or structure near the tent or canopy is occupied. See fire watch guidelines below.
        • Any tent or canopy that is within 20’ of a structure of property line will not block any existing egress points of the structure. The required egress clearance pathways will be maintained at all times.
    • If a propane or other type of heater is used the tent must have the California State Fire Marshal’s flame retardant certification seal must be visibly displayed on the tent or canopy.
    • No heaters with open flames are allowed within any tent or canopy within SLC boundaries.
    • A plan for the interior of the tent, including seating arrangements and the location and type of heating.
    • A full set of construction documents including structural calculation and detailed drawings of connections are required and will be reviewed at the discretion of the Fire Marshal.
    • The time period for which the tent or structure is intended to be in place. No longer than 180 days per Salt Lake City requirements.

    General Requirements for all Tents, Canopies, & Temporary Structures:

    • All tents and membrane structures must be properly secured in case of wind (40 mph basic wind speed and 90 mph 3-second gust).
    • Securing of the structures is the responsibility of the owner/operator (refer to IBC 1609)
    • A portable fire extinguisher with a minimum 2A10BC rating must be accessible within 75 feet walking distance of all tents/temporary structures, at a minimum, as required by section 906 of the IFC.
    • All extinguishers require a current State Fire Marshal’s inspection tag. Inspection tags are required annually.
    • No smoking signs must be provided in each permitted tent.
    • Exits shall be clearly marked and lighted when the exits serve an occupant load of 50 or more.
    • All compressed gas bottles must be secured at all times to prevent them from tipping over. No compressed gas bottles will be stored within a tent.
    • Generators must be maintained at least 20 feet from any tent or temporary structure.
    • No combustible waste can be stored within 30 feet of a tent or temporary structure.
    • Training of personnel on firewatch to ensure no other responsibilities, how to contact fire dept, how to notify occupants of problem and evacuation plan. Get the required Fire Watch Log printable here.

    DABC LICENSE EXTENSION

    Who needs it? If you are going to be using the public right-of-way to extend outdoor dining AND serving alcohol.

    Request for extension application here: https://abc.utah.gov/wp-content/uploads/Compliance/Forms/2.-Extension_of_premises.pdf

    You must work with your DABC compliance officer to extend your liquor license if you want to serve alcohol in your outdoor dining patio.

    The DABC will require:

    • Salt Lake City local consent
    • You will need to request a letter of local consent by emailing your extension of insurance and site plan
    • Extension of insurance
    • Site plan
    • DABC temporary license extension application

    We recommend that you contact your compliance officer as soon as you decide to apply with Salt Lake City in order to inform them that the liquor license extension will be coming.

    PLEASE NOTE: Outdoor dining areas must have a clearly delineated premises secured by a sturdy, free-standing barrier that enables the licensee to maintain control over the premises and prevent alcohol from leaving the licensed premises. This must be indicated in your site plan. Work with your compliance officer to ensure your patio is properly barricaded.

    Please note that DABC license extensions currently automatically expire on January 1, 2021.

    FAQ’s

    As part of Salt Lake City’s dedicated customer service approach, the city offers a process navigator, Liesl Limburg, to help answer questions and navigate applicable rules and regulations. Reach out to her at ed@slcgov.com.

    Where do I go to apply or find more information?

    Start the building process by requesting a permit application via email, Real_Estate@slc.gov. If you need a fire permit, apply at https://aca.slcfire.com. If you are going to be using the public right-of-way to extend outdoor dining AND serving alcohol, apply at https://abc.utah.gov/wp-content/uploads/Compliance/Forms/2.-Extension_of_premises.pdf

    What is this program about?

    Salt Lake City’s temporary outdoor dining program offers restaurant and bar establishments in the city an opportunity to expand their footprints to create more social distancing. The program has a streamlined permitting process, while ensuring that mobility and safety remain top priorities.

    Who is eligible?

    Restaurants, cafes, fast food outlets, coffee shops, bars, taverns, brew pubs, breweries, microbreweries, distillery pubs, tasting rooms, and other similar places of public accommodation offering food, beverages, or alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption. All current rules during the pandemic still apply to food trucks and other mobile food establishments. While this program doesn’t apply to these, they have been able to continue to operate and serve to-go food while following recommended guidelines for social distancing, sanitary and hygiene practices.

    Can retail businesses apply to expand their pre-existing outdoor space?

    Salt Lake City’s zoning codes already allow for temporary outdoor retail sales on private property. The temporary use requires a zoning permit, which may have conditions or limitations depending on the retail business’s specific zoning. Visit www.slcpermits.com for more information.

    What are the allowed hours of operation for the temporary outdoor expansion?

    Salt Lake City is following standard hours of operation for the outdoor expansion. The State of Utah currently has a health order in place that bans alcohol service after 10 p.m.

    Is there an application fee?

    Temporary Business Permit (for Right of Way) is $9/month for 5 tables or less, and $11/month for 6 or more tables. Temporary Use Permit for private property is $265. Operational Fire Permit is $173 + $1 for each additional temporary structure.

    Is the application available in other languages?

    Default browser translators used by most people for their language of choice will translate the application. Email applications will receive individual assistance.

    Can we use our existing patio as is without an application?

    Yes, if the patio will be used for food service only. If the patio will be used for alcohol service as well, it may also be used as is without application, as long as it is included in the liquor-licensed premises before alcohol service begins. All food and beverage service must comply with applicable public health orders.

    How far from the business can the outdoor area go?

    It depends on your unique circumstances. Private businesses may extend 10 feet out into the right of way from property lines. There are additional options open if you would like to use the right of way or parklet (parking space) in front of your business.

    Can I erect/build/install furniture, tents, railings, etc.?

    Requests to expand in the public right-of-way will be handled on a case by case basis. The outdoor area may include temporary tables, benches, chairs, tents and shade devices, as well as temporary railings and other means of containment and separation between patrons and the public. All furnishings and lighting must be easily removed at the end of the program period. Items in city right-of-way must be placed in areas that do not inhibit drainage or block ADA access or access to utility and storm vaults. Depending on what you are installing, electrical, building, or fire permits may be needed. Additionally, if the outdoor area includes public right-of-way, safety measures (such as signage, traffic control, barricades, and barriers) may be required to ensure mobility and safety for both patrons and the public. Salt Lake City will also require information documenting that structures in the right-of-way can withstand Salt Lake City’s snow and wind loads and are being used consistent with the manufacturer’s specifications. Businesses with liquor licenses must demonstrate they can control their premise in accordance with state statue and rules; however, they are not required to mark the liquor-licensed premise by installing railings or any other furniture.

    Can customers bring their own lawn chairs, etc.?

    No, the business must provide (and limit, based on social distancing) the seating.

    Can these patios be used for standing areas, games, movies, broadcast sports,etc.?

    Outdoor patios established or expanded under this program can be used only for the following activities: • Sit-down dining at properly distanced tables • Customer pick-up/carry-outservice; • Recorded ambient music, background music and televisions if in compliance with Salt Lake City’s noise ordinance. • The following are prohibited in premises established or expanded under this program: o “Standing areas” for guests or drink rails; o Outdoor games such as cornhole or any activity where customers are sharing equipment; o Live music, dancing, shows or entertainment o Loudspeaker call systems; and o Animals are not permitted on the expanded outdoor premises except as provided in the Americans with Disabilities Act. They cannot be used for “standing areas” or drink rails, as these would promote congregating. They cannot be used for yard games or other similar activities that would encourage people to congregate or share equipment. Businesses cannot provide live music or other forms of live entertainment. Pets are not permitted on the expanded outdoor premises except as provided in the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Are there any requirements for businesses that allow recorded or ambient music or televised sports on the expanded outdoor patio?

    If a business would like to provide recorded music or televisions on the extended patio, they must ensure the neighborhood was notified through a five-day posting. If a business was previously approved for an expanded patio and the posting did not indicate they would be having recorded or ambient music or televised sports, they must re-post for five days before playing music or using TVs. The language for an updated posting will be provided to businesses by Salt Lake City Excise and Licenses. Note: These restrictions apply to the new, temporary outdoor patio space only. Existing permanent patios or indoor spaces may have different allowances.

    Can I offer live entertainment, amplified sound, or other types of entertainment in my original space?

    Yes, but performers must adhere to the following requirements: • Performers whose performance includes forced exhalation that increases the potential to aerosolize respiratory droplets, such as speaking or shouting, singing, playing some instruments, or physical exertion, must maintain at least a 25-foot distance from attendees or patrons at all times during their performance; • Performers must maintain at least a six-foot distance from each other and other employees at all times during their performance; • Performers at indoor venues must wear a face covering at all times; and • Performers should use a separate entrance and exit from spectators orpatrons. • Any noise emitted from the premises that crosses a property line and enters onto any other premises must not exceed the noise level limits specified in Table A of the Noise Ordinance.

    Is smoking allowed in the new outdoor area?

    No.

    Would businesses have to add outdoor bathroom units if they didn't want to open their in restaurant bathrooms?

    The indoor restrooms with plumbed water would need to be available in accordance with the state’s requirements for social distancing inside multi-stall restrooms and frequent cleaning protocols. Restrooms must be cleaned and disinfected every hour.

    Can I modify my approved application as things change over time?

    Yes, just submit a new application that outlines the changes.

    What are the public health requirements? (e.g., how many tables allowed, minimum spacing, number of occupants, face coverings)

    Face coverings are required for employees and customers when not seated at a table. Please consult the most recent public health order and the State of Utah’s restaurant guidance for additional requirements. For structures less than 200 ft. the party must be limited to patrons from the same household.

    Is risk of transmission lower for outdoor dining compared to indoor dining?

    Outbreak trends suggests risk outdoors may be lower, however this does not diminish the need for physical distancing and continued use of face coverings. People from different households are discouraged from dining together to reduce risk of transmission. Outdoor seating and congregating should follow the same guidelines as indoor dining, to the extent possible, including tables effectively spaced. Because there is much still unknown about COVID-19 and transmission, we will closely evaluate disease trends as restrictions are lifted. Any added cover or walls to the outdoor space would decrease the airflow and increase the risk of transmission.

    What will the Salt Lake City consider when reviewing a proposal to use or close the public right of way?

    Upon receipt of a right of way permit request, a right of way inspector will visit the business location and consider the closure proposal from a mobility and safety perspective. An inspector may be able to approve a simple inspection in the field and issue the permit within a couple of business days, pending the layout of the site. More complex requests will be reviewed for: • Safety: ensuring any closure of the public right of way is done safely. • Mobility: considering impacts to people’s ability to get around the closure by foot, bike, wheelchair and car and how the proposal mitigates impacts with a traffic control plan, if necessary. • Local and emergency access: local access to adjacent homes and businesses must be maintained. • Potential conflicts with other planned projects including special events and impact to utility and stormwater conveyance systems. Following implementation of any right of way closure, SLC will do a final inspection to ensure the closure is meeting the permit requirements.

    What types of right of way will restaurants and bars be able to use?

    Restaurants and bars may request closure of sidewalks and streets, including parking lanes and travel lanes. Requests to close the public right-of-way are evaluated on a case by case basis.

    What are the insurance requirements for businesses expanding onto public property?

    Applicants must maintain insurance coverage for the full term of the street occupancy permit through the end of this program and use of the public space. The insurance policy must name the City and County of Salt Lake City, its elected and appointed officials, employees and volunteers as an additional insured, with minimum limits of coverage of $250,000/$500,000 for bodily injury and $10,000 for property damage, naming the location/address of the encroachment on public property for which permit is issued, or the physical address.

    How will you handle it if a city project or private development project has already pulled a right of way permit for a particular area or location?

    Work that SLC is already aware of and that may be moving through city processes would take priority over a newly received request; both may be accommodated, depending on the actual proposal and timing of the closures.

    Do I need to provide additional parking for the new expanded outdoor area of my restaurant/bar?

    No.

    What zone districts are allowed?

    Salt Lake City Zoning Code: Mixed-Use Commercial Zone Districts, and all PUD zone districts that allow an eligible business use.

    What can I set up without a permit?

    If being erected on a temporary basis only (180 days or less): • Tents under 200 square feet in size do not need permits. • Other structures (including greenhouses, personal domes, etc.) under 120 square feet in size do not need permits. • “Tents” are made of fabric or other pliable materials, with or without sidewalls. Other material types (glass, steel bases, etc.) would not be considered a tent. • Permits are not needed for lights and heat plugged into an outdoor outlet.

    What is allowed for heating outdoor dining areas and what is the required inspection from the Salt Lake City Fire Department?

    Temporary heating (propane heater, fire pits. etc.) is allowed with an operational permit from Salt Lake City Fire. Tying into existing gas or electric lines is allowed with a mechanical/plumbing or electrical permit from Community Planning and Development. Electric heaters are also allowed if the electricity source is connected to an outdoor building outlet, there is mitigation to prevent tripping hazards to extension cords and the electrical extension is designed and approved for outdoor use. Running an extension cord from an indoor outlet to a temporary outdoor expansion structure is prohibited, with some exceptions possible on a case-by-case basis from the Salt Lake City Fire Department.

    What is the requirement for snow removal in an outdoor dining area in a right of way or street?

    Each establishment is responsible for clearing the sidewalk, tree lawn and parking lanes of snow and ice after each snowfall. Additionally, the city’s snowplows throw snow. Each applicant under this program is responsible for removing and protecting any items in or adjacent to the public right-of-way that might be damaged by the city’s snow removal operations. This includes but is not limited to tables, chairs, umbrellas, planters, carpet, and barriers. The city assumes no responsibility for any damage to private property in the expanded outdoor dining area, and permittee expressly releases City from all liability, damage, and cost for any damage to private property in the permit area. The plows are large machines designed to remove the snow, but not designed with the intention of being specific to a location. We strongly recommend watching weather forecasts and plan ahead for snowfall.