Salt Lake City

Emergency Management

(801) 799-3605 | bereadyslc@slcgov.com

Flood Awareness

Floods can happen anywhere — just one inch of floodwater can cause up to $25,000 in damage. Most homeowners insurance does not cover flood damage. Flood insurance is a separate policy that can cover buildings, the contents in a building, or both, so it is important to protect your most important financial assets — your home, your business, your possessions.

EVEN HOMES OUTSIDE OF DESIGNATED FLOODPLAINS ARE AT RISK – You do not need to live near water to experience flooding. More than 70% of flooding in Utah in the past few years has been outside of the Special Flood Hazard area. Utah has had more flooding and rain events in recent years and not all flood risk is mapped in Utah.

Homeowners’ insurance does not cover losses due to flooding. Flood insurance policies are available through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). If your agent does not write flood insurance visit, for more information:  FloodSmart.gov.

What is a flood?

Flooding is a temporary overflow of water onto land that is normally dry. Floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States. Failing to evacuate flooded areas or entering flood waters can lead to injury or death.

Floods may:

  • Result from rain, snow, coastal storms, storm surges and overflows of dams and other water systems.
  • Develop slowly or quickly. Flash floods can come with no warning.
  • Cause outages, disrupt transportation, damage buildings and create landslides.

How to Purchase Flood Insurance

To purchase flood insurance, call your insurance company or insurance agent, the same person who sells your home or auto insurance. If you need help finding a provider go to FloodSmart.gov/find or call the NFIP at 877-336-2627.

Plan ahead as there is typically a 30-day waiting period for an NFIP policy to go into effect unless the coverage is mandated it is purchased as required by a federally backed lender or is related to a community flood map change.

Prepare for a flood


Surviving a flooding incident

  • Depending on where you are, the potential impact, and the warning time is given for flooding, go to the safe location that you have identified. If you are not able to shelter in place or with family or friends and must go to a public shelter, remember to bring items that can help protect you and others from COVID-19, such as hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol, cleaning materials, and two cloth masks per person. If you can, wash your face covering regularly. Children under 2 years old, people who have trouble breathing, and those who are unable to remove masks on their own should not wear them.
  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately. Never drive around barricades. Local responders use them to safely direct traffic out of flooded areas.
  • If you are sick and need medical attention, contact your healthcare provider for further care instructions and shelter in place, if possible. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1 and let the operator know if you have, or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a mask before help arrives. If staying at a shelter or public facility, alert shelter staff immediately so they can call a local hospital or clinic.
  • Listen to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions regarding flooding and COVID-19.
  • Do not walk, swim or drive through floodwaters. Turn-Around. Don’t Drown!
  • Stay off bridges over fast-moving water. Fast-moving water can wash bridges away without warning.
  • If your car is trapped in rapidly moving water stay inside. If water is rising inside the car get on the roof.
  • If trapped in a building go to its highest level. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising floodwater. Only get on the roof if necessary and once there signal for help.

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