Salt Lake City

MyStreet

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Surface Treatment Projects

Chip seal project in action

Surface Treatment Projects

Salt Lake City needs your feedback about the proposed changes to the roadway striping! Take the survey to submit comments and send us an email if you have questions.

Overview

Each year, the Salt Lake City Streets Division strives to resurface 130 lane miles of Salt Lake City roadway. This street maintenance, which is completed over just a few days, is a cost effective way to prolong the lifespan of the street network. In some cases, surface treatments provide an opportunity for the Transportation Division to improve the roadway striping. Use this webpage to view a map of this year’s surface treatment projects, learn about the maintenance process, and provide comments on the streets with proposed changes to the striping layout.


Lane reconfigurations (striping changes)

We want your feedback! Please review each of the projects below and take the survey to provide your comments. You can also email us at streetresurfacing@slcgov.com.

1700 South (900 East to 1100 East)

1700 South (900 East to 1100 East)

This segment of 1700 South currently has one vehicle travel lane in each direction, an eastbound bike lane, and on-street parking on the north side of the street. People heading westbound on bicycles share the lane with 30 MPH vehicle traffic.

The new lane configuration removes on-street parking on the north side of the street to create space for a westbound bike lane.

700 East (South Temple to 300 South)

700 East (South Temple to 300 South)

There are two sections of 700 East with differing proposed lane reconfigurations: South Temple to 100 South and 100 South to 300 South.

South Temple to 100 South currently has three vehicle travel lanes in each direction. The new concept converts one vehicle travel lane in each direction to a wide buffered bike lane. This block of 700 East has lower vehicle traffic volumes, as many drivers take 100 South and 400 South to the University of Utah.

100 South to 300 South also has three vehicle travel lanes in each direction. The new concept slightly narrows each travel lane to make space for a bike lane in each direction.

The addition of bike lanes will improve connectivity, making it easier for residents cycling to reach businesses, housing, and nearby bike routes along 700 East.

There will be minimal on-street parking changes as part of this project.

500 North (800 West to 1200 West)

500 North (800 West to 1200 West)

This segment of 500 North spans more than 60 feet in width! Due to the ample width, we are proposing to add bike lanes from 800 West to 1200 West. This bike route will connect to the existing north-south bike routes in the Fairpark neighborhood.

These roads have been identified for potential striping changes and undergo an evaluation process guided by citywide plans, technical analysis, and public feedback. Citywide plans detail the vision and policies that guide growth and development. City transportation projects in particular are guided by the 2015 Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan which provides a guiding framework, recommendations, and policies for pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure improvements. In keeping with the City’s Complete Streets Ordinance, the plan recognizes walking and bicycling as integral to the City’s transportation systems, while also acknowledging the significant health, wellness, and recreational benefits.


Learn About Surface Treatments

What Is a Surface Treatment?

What Is a Surface Treatment?

Surface treatments are a type of asphalt maintenance designed to extend the lifespan of the roadway. They also restore texture to the road surface and improve resistance to water intrusion and oxidation. Depending on the existing condition of the asphalt pavement, a surface treatment can extend the lifespan of the road up to seven years! The Salt Lake City Streets Division performs two types of surface treatments: slurry seal and chip seal.

A slurry seal is the application of a mixture of water, asphalt emulsion, aggregate (very small crushed rock), and other additives to an asphalt pavement surface. On the afternoon before the day of the surface treatment, “No Parking” signs are placed alongside the road. During the day of the slurry seal, the road is closed and street sweepers clean the asphalt surface. Then a slurry truck comes along to apply the treatment to the road. Slurry seal only takes about 2-4 hours to set, which means the entire process is typically completed in a single day.

A chip seal is a multiple step process that is completed over the course of several days. On the afternoon before a surface treatment, “No Parking” signs are placed alongside the road. During the first day, crews begin by closing the road and sweeping the street to remove debris. Next, an oil tanker truck sprays oil onto the road surface. A “chipper” truck follows closely behind to spread a thin layer of “chip” (a small pea-sized rock) over the fresh coat of oil. The aggregate is embedded into the oil with the help of drum rollers. When the entire road has been chip sealed, street sweepers make another pass to remove any loose aggregate.

The surface treatment is then given 24-48 hours to set before the final fog seal stage. The roadway is re-opened to the public while the surface treatment sets. Please adhere to the temporary 15 MPH speed limit signs throughout this time. During the fog seal phase, the road is closed once again and another coat of oil is applied. This final seal improves the performance of the initial chip seal and has the additional benefit of turning the road black, improving its aesthetic appeal. The road is then re-opened once the fog seal has set.

Watch a video detailing the chip seal process.

After the completion of the surface treatment, the Streets Division lays down a fresh coat of roadway striping. Most streets are re-striped exactly how they were. However, the Transportation Division makes striping improvements to a handful of roads each year. Learn about these striping improvement projects here.

Prior to the application of a surface treatment, the city performs other maintenance operations to prepare the road for a surface treatment. This includes sealing cracks and replacing sections of deteriorating asphalt on roadways in otherwise fair condition. This work typically occurs in the fall and spring before surface treatment operations begin in the summer.

Surface Treatment FAQ

What are my responsibilities during a surface treatment?

  • Do not park on the street from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. until the “No Parking” signs are removed

  • Do not allow sprinklers to water the street the day of the surface treatment

  • Stay out of the construction zone

  • If applicable, follow temporary speed limit signs

My vehicle was towed off of my street. How can I find it?

Vehicles left on the street the morning of the surface treatment operation will be towed to a nearby street so the road can be resurfaced. Our team documents the address of relocated vehicles and reports this information to the police department to ensure the vehicle is not reported stolen. Please give us a call at 801-535-2345 to retrieve your relocated vehicle.

Will this interfere with my weekly trash pick up?

The Salt Lake City Street Division coordinates the timing of the road maintenance with the Waste & Recycling Division. This project will not interfere with weekly waste and recycling service.

How long will my street be closed?

The length of the street closure is determined by a variety of factors including the type of surface treatment, the weather, and the complexity of the roadway. Slurry seal sets faster and is a single-stage operation, so the road is typically closed at 7 a.m. and re-opened sometime in the early afternoon, depending on how quickly the slurry seal sets. To prevent material sticking to your vehicle, tracking onto your property, and damaging the new road surface, please do not drive or walk on the fresh road surface until the roadway is reopened.

A chip seal is a multi-step process that takes place over the course of several days. However, the roadway will only be closed for two days: once during the chip seal phase and once again during the fog seal phase. During the chip and fog seal processes, the road will be closed at 7 a.m. and re-opened sometime in the early afternoon. In between these two phases, while the initial chip seal is given time to set, the roadway will be open to traffic. During this time, the roadway surface may have loose gravel, so please adhere to the 15 MPH speed limit to stay safe and prevent damage to your vehicle.

Will I have access to my driveway during the surface treatment?

The Salt Lake City Streets team strives to minimize disruption to residents and businesses. Please reach out to us at 801-535-2345 if you have special needs.

Why does the city change the striping layout on certain roads?

Surface treatments provide excellent opportunities for the Salt Lake City Transportation Division to make improvements to roadway striping. These changes enhance roadway safety and make it easier for people to travel throughout the city, regardless of what mode of transportation you choose to take.

What is a lane reconfiguration?

A lane reconfiguration reduces the number of vehicle travel lanes on a roadway with the intent of increasing roadway safety and reallocating the remaining space to other modes of transportation or other public serving uses. A lane reconfiguration is intended to increase livability, safety, and mobility for all roadway users. The City has been revising the lane striping on roadways for years in order to better accommodate travel needs and safety of roadway users. Since the early 2000s over a dozen roadways have undergone lane reconfigurations, ranging from larger seven lane roadways like North Temple to roadways in residential areas like 1300 East.

Why do you seem to do so many lane reconfigurations as part of resurfacing projects?

A lane reconfiguration is one of the changes that can be made by striping and signing only, which is why it is commonly implemented during a resurfacing project. The surface treatment covers all existing paint on the road, resulting in a blank slate and providing us the opportunity to reduce the number of vehicle travel lanes. If determined appropriate by the Transportation Division, the number , size, and location of vehicle travel lanes can be changed as part of a surface treatment project to better meet the overall needs of the transportation network.

Why can’t you add additional transportation projects to the roadway during a resurfacing treatment?

Surface treatments are maintenance efforts scheduled based on asphalt quality. In some instances, we coordinate transportation projects with maintenance-oriented surface treatments. However, since transformative transportation projects often take years to develop, secure funding for, design, and construct, it is often impractical to postpone a surface treatment to coincide with the construction of a nearby transportation project.

Can the signs be replaced with flashing signs and speed radar signs as part of the surface treatment?

Typically, signage upgrades are not a part of the City’s surface treatment for a roadway. The surface treatment is meant to prolong the life of the asphalt and is independent of signage upgrades. If the striping is being changed as part of a surface treatment project, then signage changes will be made to ensure that the new roadway layout is signed appropriately.

Will you be reconstructing the street?

No, the surface treatment is not a full reconstruction. The surface treatment is used to prolong the life of the current asphalt roadway and delay future roadway reconstruction. Roadway reconstructions are significantly more expensive, time consuming, and impactful to road users. It involves removing and replacing all asphalt (and sometimes road base, curb, gutter, and sidewalk). A surface treatment is simply applied on top of the existing asphalt and is more economical and faster to implement than a reconstruction.

If my street is receiving a surface treatment this year, does that mean it’s going to be reconstructed soon?

Probably not. In fact, if your street is in good enough condition to receive a surface treatment, then it’s likely that it isn’t near the top of the list for a full reconstruction.

My street looks to be in really poor condition, will it be resurfaced soon?

Probably not. When the condition of a street is too poor, it will need to eventually receive a full roadway reconstruction. Applying a surface treatment to a street with poor or degraded asphalt will have little to no effect on extending the life of the roadway. It is also a waste of public resources because the surface treatment will be replaced by an inevitable roadway reconstruction.

Why are surface treatments rescheduled?

Surface treatment operations are typically rescheduled for two reasons: weather and equipment breakdowns. Surface treatments require warm temperatures and fair weather. On occasion, a typical Utah summer thunderstorm passes through to rain on our parade. Other times, our complex surface treatment equipment doesn’t perform the way we’d like it to. In the case of an equipment breakdown or poor weather, we will post a notification on your door and reschedule the surface treatment project.

Why does the city use two different types of surface treatments?

Slurry seal and chip seal are designed for different roadway conditions. If a roadway is in poor condition, the city will typically apply a chip seal. This type of treatment utilizes small pea-sized pieces of gravel, which makes the treatment more robust and longer lasting. For roadways in fair to new condition, a slurry seal is a more appropriate treatment.

My road was reconstructed last year. Why is the city already working on it again?

The best time to perform a surface treatment is one to two years after a road is constructed. The surface treatment re-seals the road to prevent water intrusion which can quickly deteriorate the condition of the asphalt. Completing this process soon after a road is constructed provides the greatest possible benefit to the longevity of the asphalt.

How does the city determine what roads receive a surface treatment?

The streets that receive a surface treatment each year are selected based on the OCI (overall condition index), type of road (arterial, collector, or local), cost-effectiveness, and suitability. The Streets Division performs chip and slurry seal surface treatments to city streets that have a fair to good condition. Out of the 155 lane miles targeted for maintenance each year, approximately 100 lane miles are slurry sealed, 50 lanes miles are chip sealed, and 5 lane miles are inlays. The program begins surface treatment operations in May and continues through September.

Timeline

Timeline

Early SpringProject announcement
Late SpringDraft striping layout available for community input through survey on roads with potential striping changes
3-4 weeks before surface treatmentFinal striping layout available on website and door hanger notice sent to residents that outlines what to expect during the surface treatment project
SummerSurface treatment and restriping completed by SLC Streets Division

Funding

Funding

Increased pavement maintenance is one of the projects funded through Funding Our Future sales tax. 

Lane Reconfiguration Projects Archive

2023

400 East (400 South to 1300 South and 1700 South to 2100 South)

In the summer of 2023, Salt Lake City resurfaced 400 East from 400 South to 1300 South and from 1700 South to 2100 South. 400 East between 400 South and 900 South has relatively low vehicle traffic volumes that can be supported by one vehicle travel lane in each direction. Therefore, one northbound and one southbound vehicle travel lane was removed and parking protected bike lanes were added. This lane reconfiguration has several potential benefits:

  • Reduction of rear-end and left-turn crashes due to the dedicated left-turn lane

  • Reduced right-angle crashes as side street motorists cross three versus four travel lanes

  • Fewer lanes for pedestrians to cross

  • Opportunity to install bicycle lanes and future improvements

  • Traffic calming effect and more consistent speeds

  • A more community-focused, Complete Streets environment that better accommodates the needs of all road users

A parking protected bike lane moves the on-street vehicle parking away from the curb and gutter. The bike lane now sits between the curb and the on-street parking. The line of parked vehicles in the roadway act as a physical barrier between moving vehicles and cyclists in the bike lane. This style of bike lane is safer and more comfortable for cyclists compared to a standard painted bike lane. Experienced cyclists can still choose to ride in the vehicle travel lanes if they desire.

Previous 400 East design between 400 South and 900 South

A cross section of 400 East between 600 South and 900 South. There are two vehicle travel lanes in each direction, on-street parking on both sides of the street, and a center two-way turn lane in the middle.

New 400 East design between 400 South and 900 South with parking protected bike lanes

A proposed cross section of 400 East between 600 South and 900 South. There is a single vehicle travel lane in each direction, on-street parking on both sides of the street, a parking protected bike lane in each direction, and a center two-way turn lane in the middle.

Before

After

400 East from 1700 South to 2100 South

South of 900 South the roadway is narrower and predominantly lined with single family homes. An on-street bike lane currently exists in the southbound direction with shared lane markings in the northbound direction. The project team will be reviewing this section of roadway to determine if striping changes are applicable as part of this project.

500 East (600 South to 900 South)

In the summer of 2023, Salt Lake City resurfaced 500 East from 400 South to 900 South. The changes included the removal of one northbound and one southbound travel lane and the addition of new buffered bike lanes. This lane configuration matches what currently exists south of 900 South in front of Liberty Park. The Transportation Division is confident that one vehicle travel lane in each direction will comfortably support the relatively low vehicle traffic volume on 500 East, while also making the street more comfortable and safe for all roadway users.

In the area between 400 South and 500 South, only the southbound lanes will be modified to accommodate the change in travel lanes further south. The new striping will consist of one travel lane in each direction with buffered bike lanes and on-street parking. Near the intersections, parking will be restricted to accommodate a left turn pocket. The proposed parking restrictions generally match the existing parking restrictions prior to the striping change.

Previous Lane Configuration

500 East existing cross section depicting on-street parking on both sides of the road and two travel lanes in each direction.

New Lane Configuration

A proposed cross section of 500 East depicting on-street parking on both sides of the street, a buffered bike lane in each direction, and a travel lane in each direction.

Conditions Before Lane Reconfiguration

900 East (2700 South to Millcreek City Boundary)

In 2023, Salt Lake City restriped 900 East from 2700 South to Millcreek City boundary near Elgin Avenue.  Changes included the removal of the center turn lane and the addition of bike lanes. The new configuration consists of one vehicle travel lane and one bike lane in each direction. Minimal changes will be made to the on-street parking. Near the intersection at 2700 South, parking will be restricted to make space for a left turn queue at the traffic signal. This lane configuration will maintain the same level of vehicle traffic and parking while making the roadway more comfortable and safe for all roadway users.

Previous Lane Configuration

The existing cross section of 900 East depicting on-street parking on both sides of the street, a single travel lane in each direction, and a center two-way left turn lane in the middle of the road.

New Lane Configuration

A proposed cross section of 900 East depicting parking on both sides of the street, a travel lane in each direction, and a painted bike lane in each direction.

Before

After

A bike lane on 900 East
1700 South (300 West to Redwood Road) – Postponed

In the summer of 2024, Salt Lake City plans to resurface 1700 South from 300 West to Redwood Road. This resurfacing presents an exciting opportunity for the City and community to reimagine changes to striping on this stretch of street between the newly constructed 300 West bikeway and the forthcoming Glendale Regional Park.

The Transportation Division has already created a concept for the stretch between 300 West and 900 West that removes one vehicle travel lane in each direction while also creating wider and more comfortable buffered bike lanes. The Transportation Division has analyzed traffic volume data for the full project extent and is confident that one vehicle travel lane in each direction will support the relatively low vehicle traffic volumes on this corridor. This lane reconfiguration has several potential benefits:

  • Reduced right-angle crashes as side street motorists cross three versus four travel lanes

  • Fewer lanes for pedestrians to cross

  • Opportunity to improve bike lanes and future improvements

  • Traffic calming effect and more consistent speeds

  • A more community-focused, Complete Streets environment that better accommodates the needs of all road users

Existing Street Layout – 300 West to 900 West

The existing cross section of 1700 South between 300 West and 900 West. There are two vehicle travel lanes in each direction, a narrow bike lane in each direction, and a center two-way turn lane in the middle.

Proposed Street Layout – 300 West to 900 West

The proposed cross section of 1700 South. It includes one vehicle travel lane in each direction, one buffered bike lane in each direction, and a center two-way turn lane in the middle.

Existing Conditions – 300 West to 900 West

In addition, the Transportation Division is starting work on a concept for the stretch of 1700 South between 900 West and Redwood where we are thinking through potential changes to striping (paint), including travel lanes, turn lanes, and bike lanes. We will have more updates on this part of the project in the coming months.

2022

Avenues Streets

In 2022, Salt Lake City will resurface (or slurry seal) several streets in the Avenues neighborhood, including:

  • B Street (1st Avenue to 11th Avenue)

  • 3rd Avenue (E Street to Virginia Street)

  • 11th Avenue (B Street to Terrace Hills Drive)

  • Terrace Hills Drive (11th Avenue to the northern terminus)
800 South (at West Temple)

This summer the 800 South/West Temple intersection will be modified to add an additional westbound left-turn lane. When the project is completed, the intersection will have two westbound left-turn lanes to aid in providing motorists access to the West Temple freeway on-ramp. The modification is part of a larger project on 900 South. To learn more about the project on 900 South, please visit the 900 South Reconstruction project webpage.

2700 South (700 East to Highland Drive)

This summer, Salt Lake City will resurface and restripe 2700 South from 700 East to Highland Drive.  This is an important step in maintaining the life of the pavement and also provides us with an opportunity to address a missing gap in our transportation network.  As part of the project, on-street bike lanes will be added to the entire extent of the project, connecting to previous projects that have developed bike lanes east and west from this area.  When the project is complete, bike lanes will extend from 2000 East to 300 West.  Completion of this section of our infrastructure reflects the culmination of years of work completed by both Salt Lake City and South Salt Lake City.

These important changes will be accompanied with modifications to on-street parking.  On-street parking will be removed from the north side of 2700 South between 700 East and Elizabeth Street (1155 East) as shown below.  On-street parking will also be removed from the south side of 2700 South between Elizabeth Street (1155 East) and Highland Drive.  These areas have been selected for these parking adjustments based on an analysis of parking use and availability that was completed over multiple days earlier in 2022. 

Draft Design for 2700 South, west of Elizabeth Street
Main Street (700 South to 2100 South)

Since May of this year our project team has been gathering input on the proposed striping changes to Main Street from 700 South to 2100 South as part of the August street resurfacing project. The resurfacing project is not a street reconstruction project that alters curbs, landscaping, or traffic signals, but it creates an opportunity to reconsider the street design and prepare for future upgrades. The ongoing Life on State: Bikeways Study has been looking at ways to make Main Street a high-quality alternative to cycling on State Street, in addition to other street changes that improve safety and support the community. Resurfacing activities began the week of August 15th, 2022, and most of the work will be completed by September. Addition of green bike lane striping and signage changes will follow in September. 

So, what did we hear? 

  • Support for reducing the number of travel lanes between 800 South and 1700 South. While canvassing the corridor and talking to people, our team heard similar comments about this welcome change that will increase safety. 
  • Support for crosswalk improvements. 
  • Support for bike lane improvements, including providing parking-protected bike lanes, and extending bike lanes south into South Salt Lake. 
  • Support for changes that help reduce speeding traffic.
  • Enthusiasm for additional investment on the corridor. Many people said they welcome basic changes but don’t want it to stop there. More trees, landscaping, more place, less pavement. 

The resurfacing project took steps toward these goals by making the following changes:

  • One travel lane in each direction with center two-way-left-turn lane, which functions as a left turn lane at intersections and provides space for future crosswalk refuge islands. This will require reducing the existing number of vehicle lanes between 800 South and 1700 South, matching the design that exists between 1700 South and 2100 South. The reduction of travel lanes to one in each direction with a center turn lane will have major safety benefits at crosswalks, while also reducing the frequency of vehicle crashes by as much as 25%.
  • Bike lanes widened (6 ft minimum) including painted buffer where space allows.
  • Improvements to bike lane continuity at intersections.
  • Parallel on-street parking was maintained next to curb/gutter, widened in some areas where parking currently encroaches into the bike lane. Existing parking stalls set back from the travel lane that are within City property, between the roadway and sidewalk, are not impacted.

Why not parking-protected bike lanes? 

This was a common response from people who shared feedback about the striping plan, since the design has worked well on 200 E and 300 East (500 South to 900 South). It’s a fair question, and there a few reasons why Main Street is not a great candidate: 

  • Frequent driveways and parkstrip parking create discontinuities and conflict points in the PPBL. 
  • The area next to the curb and gutter is not a good place to position cyclists. The curb is crumbling into the gutter, pavement is rough, and driveway tie-ins are irregular. 
  • The buffered bike lane will be swept and kept free of snow without additional maintenance requirements.

The Big Picture

While the resurfacing and roadway striping changes won’t accomplish everything, the corridor is better positioned for future planned upgrades in 2022 and beyond. The City is developing a vision document for long-term, transformational improvements on Main Street that will narrow the pavement width and add a separated bike lane and wider sidewalks from 700 South to 2100 South. The new design will also include features like street trees, waterwise landscaping, public art, sidewalk dining, and bike parking.  These features will vary depending on the land use of individual street segments, so that the City’s investment can best support businesses and residents along Main Street. This future effort will require a full reconstruction of the street, and is a more significant investment than the City can afford at this time. In the meantime, incremental steps are being taken that will address many of the immediate safety concerns (especially at crossings) and provide significant bicycling improvements. 

Main Street Final Striping Plan

bikelifeonstate@slcgov.com

801-535-7764

Life on State Bikeways Study project page

2021

1000 West (North Temple to 600 North)

Project Update

After receiving more feedback from the community and upon further discussions, we decided to keep the striping as is for now and engage with the community to develop a more robust plan for 1000 West. The 1000 West “mini-corridor study” will allow Salt Lake City to engage with all stakeholders, including the State Fair Park, residents, and Community Council, whom expressed support for creating a shared vision for the street. We are hopeful the process will result in meaningful changes that go beyond basic pavement markings. Learn more about the 1000 West Mini Corridor Study here.

Background

The project team is analyzing 1000 West from North Temple to 600 North to determine if there are opportunities to leverage the resurfacing opportunity to make changes recommended by the Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan. In the coming months, the project team will communicate with residents and the Community Council about our findings as well as ways for the public to comment on potential striping changes. Residents and the Community Council will be told in advance about any planned changes to striping.

Currently, 1000 West is a four-lane road with a continuous center turn lane and bike lanes. In 2020 the City received feedback about the street from residents, which indicated a strong interest in repurposing excessive street space to slow traffic and improve bicycling and walking safety.

Existing layout of 1000 West looking north

Draft Designs

The project team released the following draft striping plans for this section of 1000 West:

Version A within Existing Striping

Version B Parking Protected Bike Lane at Fairpark

200 East (600 South to 1300 South)
Existing layout of 200 East looking north

Project Update

We heard from local businesses and residents the need for more on-street parking while still accommodating vehicle mobility and increasing bicycle comfort and pedestrian-friendly areas. Based on feedback and street vehicle volumes, the new street design will have the following enhancements: 

  • Increased on-street parking by adding angled parking
  • Parking protected bicycle lanes going northbound (700 S to 900 S). Buffered bike lanes elsewhere.
  • High-visibility merge areas for bike lanes where there are right turns 
  • Maintaining vehicle flow

This resurfacing design is a significant transformation for 200 East—one that helps balance various needs—supporting local businesses and laying the foundation for future upgrades to keep this area a happening place.

When does street resurfacing start?

Our street resurfacing team doesn’t waste time! They will be starting the first stage of street treatments next week. Then over the next several weeks, striping and parking delineation will go in. Adjacent homes on 200 & 300 East, be on the lookout for door hanger notifications. You’ll receive those 24 hours in advance of any surface treatments. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to stay up to date on the street resurfacing progress @SLCmoves.

Learn more about the Life on State: Bikeways Study here: www.lifeonstate.com/bikewaysstudyhome

What else is happening on 200 East?

Note that this change is part of a coordinated effort to develop a network of bike facilities adjacent to State Street per the Life on State Implementation: Bikeways Study. 200 East south of 900 South is a quiet residential street and is an ideal candidate for a Neighborhood Byway. No changes to the street or parking are planned; Neighborhood Byway treatments usually involve wayfinding and interventions at major cross streets to make crossings safer and intuitive. Implementation of Neighborhood Byway components will occur separately from the resurfacing project.

An even bigger change to 200 East is planned as part of the City’s Green Loop linear park system. Detailed planning and community engagement for the Green Loop will start in 2022, so the City is looking for near-term design strategies consistent with adopted plans that are compatible with the long-term Green Loop concept. As such, the segment from 600 South to 900 South is an opportunity to reallocate street space using pavement markings to establish buffered bike lanes that may later be adapted into the Green Loop design. 

Review the images below for more information about the Green Loop.

Images from The Downtown Plan (link to PDF), pages 92-93.
400 South (I-15 to Redwood Road)

Overview

400 South, from I-15 to Redwood Road, will be chip sealed in Summer 2021. A chip seal adds another layer to the roadway surface, prolonging the life of the roadway by 5-7 years. The project team decided to make very minor adjustments to the roadway. The configuration of two travel lanes and a center turn lane will be kept in place, but narrowed very slightly to accommodate a buffer in the existing bike lane. This will result in no reduction to existing parking and no major changes to the streetscape.

Draft Design

The project team has released the following draft striping plan for this section of 400 South:

What’s Coming for 400 South?

The same corridor will likely experience bigger changes in 2022 due to a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) received in 2021. Design is still in process, but the street will feature on-road bus boarding islands with protected bike lanes. Stay tuned for future updates.

Sunnyside Avenue (Foothill Drive to City Limits)

Overview

Sunnyside Avenue, between Foothill Drive and the City limits, will be chip sealed in Summer 2021. A chip seal adds another layer to the roadway surface, prolonging the life of the roadway by 5-7 years. A chip seal also provides a blank slate and opportunities to rethink the striping for travel lanes, turn lanes, bike lanes, and parking.

The City’s proposed design would maintain the same number of travel lanes (two in each direction, and one center turn lane) in order to accommodate high volumes of motor vehicles during special events at Hogle Zoo and This is the Place Heritage Park.

Sunnyside Avenue, which connects to Emigration Canyon, also boasts the busiest bike lanes in the city. There may be opportunities to improve the width, consistency, and quality of the bike lanes, as well. The project team will be reaching out to residents and stakeholders during 2021 to collect any additional ideas.

Existing layout of Sunnyside Avenue looking east (Google Street View image)

Draft Design

The draft design for the 2021 Sunnyside Avenue restriping is now available. Click here to download the Sunnyside Avenue Draft Design (PDF).

Initial outreach to the community, bicycling groups, and Salt Lake County has revealed great ideas, almost all of which have been able to be incorporated into this first design. Your comments now will help us refine the design further and make the project even better. Please let the team know if you have comments on the draft design by either completing the survey or sending an email (survey link and email are toward the bottom of this page).

The City’s and the public’s goal is safer traffic, better bike lanes, and more predictability. Highlighted changes and benefits are included below and in the design document itself.

  • Maintaining two traffic lanes in each direction, and one center turn lane, to accommodate commuter and peak event traffic
  • Narrowing traffic lanes, resulting in safer speeds
  • Widening bike lanes and adding painted buffers in some locations
  • Repurposing nine on-street parking spaces between Connor Street and 2200 East in order to add longer dual left turn lanes (westbound) at Foothill Drive
  • Formalizing the eastbound, up-canyon lane merge east of the Crestview Drive intersection

Other possible changes (e.g., utility covers, missing or severely degraded asphalt, a new section of the 9-Line/Sunnyside trail, 2300 East crosswalk and median, free westbound right turn closure at Foothill, concrete at Arapeen and Foothill, Bonneville Shoreline trailhead, signage, and speed limits) are still being worked out and may be part of this or future projects.

200 West / Wall Street (400 North to 300 West)

Background

200 West is a two-lane road with regular bike lanes and on-street parking on both sides of the road. The regular bike lanes are consistent with the Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan. North of Fern Avenue, 200 West connects to Wall Street as it provides access to Warm Springs Park and 300 West. The evaluation will focus on the area adjacent to Warm Springs Park where there are bike lanes in the uphill direction (eastbound) and shared lane markings in the downhill direction (westbound).

Existing layout of 200 West/Wall Street looking west (Google Street View image)

Draft Design

A draft design has been prepared and can be reviewed below. Please let the team know if you have comments on the draft design by either completing the survey or sending an email (survey link and email are toward the bottom of this page).

The draft design includes the addition of a westbound bike lane from Fern Ave. to 300 West. The bike lane would connect to the existing bike lane on 200 West and would provide a continuous bike lane from the 200 West/Wall St. intersection to 300 West.

Parking changes with draft design: on-street parking on Wall St. along Warm Springs Park (north side of the road) would be removed. The parking on the south side of Wall St. (where the homes are located) would remain as-is.

The existing shared lane markings (“sharrows”) would be removed (replaced by the bike lane). Both travel lanes would remain as-is and the eastbound bike lane would be replaced as-is.

Draft Restriping for Wall Street at Warm Springs Park
Draft Striping Layout for Wall Street from 300 West to Fern Avenue (click on the image for a larger version)
300 East (500 South to 1300 South)
Existing layout of 300 East looking north (Google Street View image)

Project Update

The project team “brought it” with this design. You love your parking-protected bicycle lanes and hate the discomfort of inconsistent bicycle lane treatments. Therefore 300 East will have the following enhancements:

  • Maintain parking-protected bicycle lanes
  • Added parking-protected bicycle lanes between 500 and 600 South—this does a lot to increase safety of the existing bike lane design
  • Close the bicycle lane gap south of 900 South
  • Remove “blender lanes” by extending bicycle lane to intersection 

The new 300 East design will provide a safer and more comfortable experience for community members walking and bicycling to and from local destinations. 

As one community member wrote, “This is an integral piece for the City to move toward a consistent master plan as revitalization efforts begin to make headway and will undoubtedly enhance the atmosphere and convenience of what will soon be a vibrant and bustling section of the City.”

Learn more about the Life on State Bikeways Study.

Highland Drive (Driggs Avenue to City Line)

Background

This area has been identified as a priority corridor in the Local Link regional study. Based on a detailed review of the area, bike lanes were recommended for Highland Drive to improve access between Sugar House and Millcreek’s new downtown development. The design effort by the City will focus on incorporating bike lanes on Highland Drive. In addition, the project team will be closely coordinating with Millcreek as they are planning to restripe their section of Highland Drive (north of 3300 South) from a four-lane roadway to one lane in each direction, a center turn lane, and shoulder areas for people riding bikes. Salt Lake City will be working with Millcreek to find ways to create the best roadway between the two cities for people walking, riding bikes and driving.

Existing layout of Highland Drive looking north (Google Street View image)

Draft Concept Design

The project team studied Highland Drive from Driggs Avenue to the City limit (approximately 3000 South) to look for opportunities that make biking safer and more accessible while improving safety and efficiency for drivers. Both priorities will be accomplished on this section of Highland by restriping the road during an upcoming pavement maintenance project.

The maintenance work consists of a chip seal to preserve the life of the road and will take place in May. Once complete, the road will be striped to include a bike lane on each side of the road. To make room for the new bike lanes, on-street parking will be shifted solely to the east side of the road, except for the area in front of the retail shops on the south end of the project.

Before finalizing the design, the project team presented the plan to the Sugar House Community Council for input. To keep the community in the loop on the project, the team will send a project newsletter, deliver door hangers, and present at future community council meetings. For questions or concerns, or to subscribe to updates please contact the project team at 385-341-2898 and SaltLakeCityComms@gmail.com.

The draft design includes the addition of northbound and southbound bike lanes. On the southern end of the project area (at the Salt Lake City limit) the bike lanes will connect with the resurfacing project being completed by Millcreek, which is planned to occur this summer. Coordination with Millcreek has been occurring on both the design and timing of projects so that people can seamlessly travel between the cities.

Parking changes with draft design: on-street parking on Highland Drive between Driggs Avenue and Malvern Avenue would be removed from the west side of the road. On-street parking on the east side of the road will remain as-is.

Draft Design with Bike Lanes in both directions and On-street Parking on the East Side of the Road

For reference, the illustration below shows the existing lane layout with wide, striped shoulders.

Existing Conditions

The major intersections in the study area are also planned to receive striping changes. Below is an illustration of the draft design for the Highland Drive/2700 South intersection. The draft design continues the bike lanes through the intersection and maintains all existing vehicle turning movements.

Highland Drive/2700 South Intersection Draft Design

Below is an illustration of the draft design for the Highland Drive/1300 East intersection. The draft design continues the bike lanes through the intersection and maintains all existing vehicle turning movements. Northbound and southbound left-turn lanes have been added to allow motorists to wait for a gap in on-coming traffic without remaining in the through lanes. The green dashed bike lane just south of the intersection is intended to increase visibility of the bike lane in the area of the “free” right-turn lane and is planned to be added as part of a separate project.

Highland Drive/1300 East Intersection Draft Design

2020

Parley’s Way (2300 E to 1-80)

Overview

This project implemented some recommendations from the Parley’s Way Corridor Plan and followed the City’s Complete Streets Ordinance. Street resurfacing (chip seal) that was completed will help prolong the life of the street. Newly built median islands and enhanced crosswalks at the Wyoming Street & Stringham Avenue intersections improve safety and walkability. Other design changes include right-sizing all four lanes and repurposing the little existing on-street parking in order to paint buffered bike lanes. 

Parley’s Way following completion of the project

Community input about the street

In spring 2020, Salt Lake City gathered community input in considering options for possible changes to the striping design of this street. We asked for your fresh input, to combine with the past input.

There were changes including right-sizing all four lanes and repurposing the little existing on-street parking in order to paint buffered bike lanes. As we did our technical analysis, we wanted to understand better how the community uses the street, and locations of potential concerns.

Common themes in the survey responses:

  • People like the easy connection to the freeway, that it’s plowed well, that there’s no traffic/it’s easy to drive on, and the center turn lane
  • People don’t like the poor pavement quality, traffic speeds, lack of safe bike lanes and connections to Parley’s Trail, lack of safe crosswalks, that it’s wide and not a visually attractive street, and gutter/drainage issues
  • Regarding safety, 91% feel safe or very safe driving (or are neutral about safety) compared with 58% of people who feel safe walking and only 31% of people who feel safe bicycling
  • People typically don’t feel safe at intersections like 2300 East, Wyoming, Stringham, and Wiltshire, reasons including:
    • cars are driving too fast (speeding)
    • lack of frequent and comfortable crosswalks
    • crosswalks too long, exposed
    • speed differential, especially bikes going uphill

Parley’s Way
Parley’s Way Corridor Plan

The Salt Lake City Streets Division has resurfaced Parley’s Way (chip seal). Buffered bike lanes were added to the roadside. All traffic lanes and turn lanes remain. The eastbound outside or right turn lanes from Lynwood to Wiltshire were also be reconfigured to reduce conflict at and between nearby intersections, and solve some traffic issues that the neighborhood south of the Wiltshire Drive signal had been experiencing. The Engineering Division also installed new median islands, colored crosswalks, and crossing beacons (RRFBs) at Wyoming Street and Stringham Avenue.

These changes reflect the requests, recommendations, and values found in the 2017 Parley’s Way Corridor Plan and the early 2020 community survey results.

1000 West (600 North to North Temple)

Project Update

While we had planned for this street to receive a surface treatment in the summer of 2020, we postponed this project until the summer of 2021. This decision factored in several considerations including: condition of the street, needs on other streets, and staff/equipment prioritization.

Project Area

Community Input About This Street

In Spring 2020, Salt Lake City gathered community input for possible changes to 1000 West; our major takeaways from our survey are summarized below.

While the scope of this project was to resurface the street and address potential improvements achieved through restriping, the survey asked a variety of questions that helps the City better understand how people use the street, challenges they experience, and things they enjoy about the street. While not all issues and feedback were able to be addressed through this specific project (and may not be relevant to street and transportation projects), this community input provided context, helped identify themes, and can inform future projects.

Common themes in the survey responses:

  • Many respondents noted that the level of traffic does not warrant the number of travel lanes, although it was noted that events at the Fairgrounds generate a lot of activity and on-street parking demand.
  • The width of the street and infrequent intersection control (e.g. stop signs) can result in speeding vehicles.
  • There were several suggestions to repurpose space to take advantage of street width, including:
    • median for greening and traffic calming
    • multi-use pathway
    • protected bike lanes
    • crosswalks improvements related to visibility, reduced crossing distance/exposure

Draft Designs

The survey helped inform our Draft Designs which can be viewed below.

We developed two concepts for 1000 West: a median option and a buffered bike lane option. *Click to expand the green bar below to learn more about each option.*

Important Note: Replacing the existing roadway striping is an option. For the two reconfiguration alternatives, vehicle travel lanes would be reduced from two to one in each direction. The amount of traffic that uses 1000 West could be adequately accommodated in the lane reconfiguration of one vehicle lane in each direction. On-street parking would not be impacted by any options.

Median Option

This concept would delineate a wide center median and reduce vehicle travel lanes in each direction.  We realize that a painted median does not provide the transformative benefits of a planted median. However, by piloting the lane median concept with striping re-configuration, we have an opportunity to test it out and make refinements based on experience and feedback. If it is successful as a pilot, it would be the first step in a process to implement more transformational changes. The design concept is shown between North Temple and 300 N but represents a treatment that we are considering between 300 N to 600 N as well. This would not impact on-street parking.

Draft Design – Plan View

Median Draft Design Plan View for 1000 West

Draft Design – Cross-Section View

As a comparison, below is a cross-section of the existing conditions.

Please note: the default layout is the existing layout and it is an option for this project. Please feel free to let us know if you prefer the existing layout.

Existing Conditions – Cross-Section View

Buffered Bike Lane Option

This concept would reduce vehicle travel lanes in each direction and provide buffered bike lanes. The buffer space adjacent to the bike lanes improve cyclists comfort and safety. Initially the buffer will be striped with paint. This would not impact on-street parking.

Draft Design – Plan View

Bike Lane Draft Design Plan View for 1000 West

Draft Design – Cross-Section View

As a comparison, below is a cross-section of the existing conditions.

Please note: the default layout is the existing layout and it is an option for this project. Please feel free to let us know if you prefer the existing layout.

Existing Conditions – Cross-Section View

500 East (900 South to 1300 South)
500 East following the completion of the project

Community input about this street

In Spring 2020, Salt Lake City gathered community input for possible changes to the striping design of this street. Thanks to everyone for participating in our survey for the street resurfacing projects. For the 500 East project, our major takeaways from our survey are summarized below.

While the scope of this project is to resurface the street and address potential improvements achieved through restriping, the survey asked a variety of questions that helps the City better understand how people use the street, challenges they experience, and things they enjoy about the street. While not all issues and feedback can be addressed through this specific project (and may not be relevant to street and transportation projects), this community input provides context, helps identify themes, and can inform future projects.

Project Map

Survey Summary

Who took the survey?

The survey had a total of 122 respondents (not all people answered all the questions) and were a mix of people that live on the street, use the street to commute, own property, and those that use the street occasionally. The large majority of those that took the survey walk, bike, and drive on 500 East daily or weekly. While not all comments are consistent, this summary represents a compilation of the most common responses to the questions asked.

What do people like about this street?

People that took the survey commented on liking the street for its light vehicle traffic and speeds compared to 700 East, the locations of the crosswalks and the proximity to Liberty Park and the benefits that brings to this street.

“It’s just a great park facing & public street that serves traffic excellently between two very popular & populated areas of our young city.”

“I like that it is close to the park and has good crosswalks, I enjoy that it has good sidewalks.”

“I like that the park is right next to it.  I also like the curb extensions on the west side of the street.”

“Proximity to Liberty Park and surrounding neighborhood, with restaurants and other businesses on the corners of 900 South and 1300 South.”

What do people not like about this street?

Respondents commented on disliking the volume and speed of traffic, lack of striped bicycle lanes, missing sidewalks on the East side of the road, road surface conditions, and the lack of traffic control measures at certain intersections.

“I was bummed when this street was painted to have sharrows and the bike lane removed.  With so many users at the park, it would be great to have a walk bike space immediate parallel to the park.”

“The cars and no bike lane”

“The overflow commuter traffic from 7th east is congesting it”

“No separate defined bike lanes.  Cars often speed.”

How safe does this street feel?

People responded feeling very safe to neutral about traveling on 700 South by most modes, except for bicycling and bicycling with children. Locations where people felt unsafe were generally spread over the entire area with hot spots at intersections.  People cited lack of a bike lane as the reason they feel unsafe.

Other considerations

Respondents indicated the “Mobility of People” was the most important function for this street.

View of 500 East prior to reconstruction looking south

Draft Design

Thanks to everyone that commented on the draft designs. The comments received helped to inform the final design. The draft design would add a northbound bike lane to the roadway so that it is consistent with 500 East to the south and to meet the stated preference of the community as received in the outreach part of the project.

There would be no changes to the amount of on-street parking or number of through vehicle travel lanes as part of this project.

Draft Design – Cross-Section View

Draft Design – Plan View

As a comparison, below is a cross-section of the existing conditions.

Please note: the default layout is the existing layout and it is an option for this project. Please feel free to let us know if you prefer the existing layout.

Existing Conditions – Cross-Section View

Final Design

Thanks to everyone that commented on the draft designs. The comments received helped to inform the final design. Striping on this roadway will be changed as part of the resurfacing. The changes include:

  • Bike lanes will be added to both sides of the roadway, in accordance with input received from the Liberty Wells Community Council
  • The Center Turn Lane will be permanently removed from the roadway.

Below is a cross-section view of the upcoming striping layout (view looking north):

The changes to the striping layout have been determined based on a thorough evaluation by the Salt Lake City Transportation Division. The evaluation included a review of the traffic volumes, existing roadway characteristics, public outreach and engagement with the Liberty Wells Community Council and Bicycle Advisory Committee.

700 South (600 West to 700 East)

This street received a surface treatment in the summer of 2020. Marking and striping were changed along some stretches of the street.

700 S between 200 E and 300 E following resurfacing and restriping.
Eastern 700 South prior to resurfacing
Western 700 South prior to resurfacing

Community Input About This Street

In Spring 2020, Salt Lake City gathered community input for possible changes to the striping design of this street. For the 700 South project, our major takeaways from our survey are summarized below. *Click on the green bar to expand to the survey summary.*

While the scope of this project was to resurface the street and address potential improvements achieved through restriping, the survey asked a variety of questions that helps the City better understand how people use the street, challenges they experience, and things they enjoy about the street. While not all issues and feedback were able to be addressed through this specific project (and may not be relevant to street and transportation projects), this community input provides context, helps identify themes, and can inform future projects.

Who took the survey?

28 people took the survey (not all people answered all the questions) and were a mix of people that live on the street, use the street to commute, own property, and that use the street occasionally. More than half of those that took the survey walk, bike, and drive on 700 South daily or weekly.

What do people like about this street?

People that took the survey commented on liking the street for its light vehicle traffic compared to other streets, being wide enough to provide space for riding a bicycle, and for its connection to transit, businesses, and other parts of the city.

“I use t[r]ax to downtown so I appreciate that. I live so I walk 700 daily.”

“I love my Central City neighborhood! I appreciate that this is one of the quieter streets in the immediate area.”

“It has large safe shoulders to bike on. It’s fairly quiet.”

“It’s a quiet street that connects to several businesses i like to visit”

What do people dislike about this street?

Respondents commented on the lack of striped bicycle lanes, missing and narrow sidewalks, the street being overly wide, road surface conditions, the lack of traffic control measures at certain intersections, and people experiencing homelessness creating camps along sections of the road.

“No bike lane, bad crosswalk timers”

“Too wide! Needs a median with trees.”

“No dedicated space for bikes, narrow sidewalks, tons of asphalt”

“Homeless camps.”

“Traffic moves way too fast! We need a 4 way stop sign at the intersection of 600 E and 700 S (for traffic on 600 E moving N/S). I would love to see designated bike lanes, speedbumps, and more pop out curbs for crosswalks to ease traffic flow and make it more friendly to families, bikers, walkers etc”

How safe does this street feel?

Most people responded feeling very safe to neutral about traveling on 700 South by most modes, except for bicycling with children. People cited vehicles driving too fast and being unaware of bicyclists, and a general sense of safety, and other reasons as the cause for feeling unsafe bicycling with children.

Other considerations

Additionally, here is a sample of other things survey respondents would like to have considered:

“The lack of signage on the intersection of 600e and 700. A bike path and generally more people friendly for walking”

“This is a great place for median development and the street should be used much more efficiently to create vibrancy to the neighborhood”


Final Design

Thanks to everyone that commented on the draft designs. The comments received helped to inform the final design.

The preferred design would add bike lanes to the roadway. The number of vehicle travel lanes would remain as-is as part of this project (with the exception of turn lanes that would be removed in some locations).

The design would result in some on-street parking removed at the 700 South/Main Street intersection.

The three cross-section examples shown are representative of the project segments: 1) 600 West to 200 West, 2) 200 West to Main St, 3) Main St to 200 East, and 4) 200 East to 300 East. *Click on the green bar to expand to the project segments.*

Design for 600 West to 200 West Segment – Plan View

Design for 600 West to 200 West Segment – Cross-Section View

Design for 200 West to Main St Segment – Plan View

Design for 200 West to Main St Segment – Cross-Section View

Design for Main St to 200 East Segment – Plan View

Design for Main St to 200 East Segment – Cross-Section View

Design for 200 East to 300 East Segment – Plan View

Design for 200 East to 300 East Segment – Cross-Section View

As a comparison, below is a cross-section of the previously existing conditions.

Please note: if funding is not available for project implementation, then the existing layout will remain.

Previous Conditions for 200W to Main Street Segment– Cross-Section View

Previous Conditions for Main St to 200 East Segment – Cross-Section View

Previous Conditions for for 200 East to 300 East Segment – Cross-Section View

North Temple (I-215 to Airport Gates)

This street received a surface treatment in the summer of 2020.

North Temple following completion of the resurfacing project
Conditions of North Temple west of 2200 West prior to resurfacing

Community input about this street

In Spring 2020, Salt Lake City gathered community input for possible changes to the striping design of this street.

Thanks to everyone for participating in our survey for the street resurfacing project. For the North Temple (Airports Gates to I-215 Overpass) project, our major takeaways from our survey were:

  • Concern about the side-street stop controlled intersection at 2200 West
  • Concern about the potholes and roadway surface quality
  • Mobility of people and vehicles rank as high priorities

Final Design

Thanks to everyone that commented on the draft designs. The comments received helped to inform the final design.

The preferred design would add bike lanes to roadway. There would be no substantial change to the amount of on-street parking or number of vehicle travel lanes as part of this project.

Final Design – Plan View

North Temple Final Design Plan View

Final Design – Cross-Section View

North Temple (300 West to 400 West)

This street will receive a surface treatment in the summer of 2020. Access & parking will be restricted for a maximum of 6 daytime hours on 1-3 days. There may be changes to striping & markings.

North Temple looking Eastbound east of 400 West

Community input about this street

In Spring 2020, Salt Lake City gathered community input for possible changes to the striping design of this street.

Thanks to everyone for participating in our survey for the street resurfacing project. The comments received have helped us develop a draft layout for this block.

Thank you to everyone who took the survey!


Final Design

Please Note: Implementation of this project is dependent on funding availability. The Project Team is working to secure funding for full implementation; however, the project isn’t guaranteed to be implemented this summer.

Thanks to everyone that commented on the draft designs. The comments received helped to inform the final design.

The preferred design would begin the eastbound bus only lane on the westside of the 300 West intersection. Beginning the bus only lane would allow UTA buses to reduce the amount of time they spend in eastbound traffic at the intersection. There would be no substantial change to the amount of on-street parking or number of vehicle travel lanes as part of this project.

Final Design – Plan View

Final Design Plan View for North Temple

Please note: if funding is not available for project implementation, then the existing layout will remain.

What is next?

To be added to the project email list for future input and design updates, please send “updates for North Temple West” to streetresurfacing@slcgov.com.

Early Spring 2020Project Announcement and community input.
Spring 2020Draft conceptual design available for community input.
3-4 weeks before surface treatmentNotice of final design made public along with information about what to expect on the 1-3 days when the surface treatment work will affect use of this street.
Summer 2020Surface treatment and restriping by SLC Streets Division.
1700 South (Redwood to Pioneer)
1700 South with the new surface treatment
1700 South looking west prior to reconstruction

Community input about this street

In Spring 2020, Salt Lake City gathered community input for possible changes to the striping design of this street.

Thanks to everyone for participating in our survey for the street resurfacing projects. For the 1700 South project, our major takeaways from our survey are summarized below. *Click on the green bar to expand to the survey summary.*

While the scope of this project was to resurface the street and address potential improvements achieved through restriping, the survey asked a variety of questions that helps the City better understand how people use the street, challenges they experience, and things they enjoy about the street. While not all issues and feedback were able to be addressed through this specific project (and may not be relevant to street and transportation projects), this community input provided context, helped identify themes, and can inform future projects.

Survey Summary

People that took the survey commented on liking the street for its light vehicle traffic, ease of access and easy commute.

Respondents commented on disliking the lack of greenery, issues with the lane lines and lack of enforcement and lack of curb-gutter in some places.

People responded feeling unsafe walk, bicycling, skateboarding, walking with children, bicycling with children and using assistive devices (wheelchair, walker, crutches, etc.). Locations where people felt unsafe were generally spread over the entire area with hot spots at intersections.  People cited lack of a bike lane as the reason they feel unsafe.  Locations where people feel unsafe are spread across the project area.  Reasons for feeling unsafe include uneven surfaces, large trucks and high speeds

Respondents indicated the “Mobility of People” was the most important function for this street.  Specific changes requested included to add trees and bike lanes, as well as maintain business access (semis and delivery vehicles).

Glendale Community Council Support

Additionally, the Glendale Community Council provided a letter of support for the project requesting bike lanes and additional crosswalks.  Historically, these locations have been evaluated for marked crosswalks and were found to have too low of pedestrian demand to warrant adding the crosswalk.  This condition will continue to be monitored in the future. 

Thank you to everyone who took the survey!


Final Design

Thanks to everyone that commented on the draft designs. The comments received helped to inform the final design.

The preferred design has incorporated the desire to add protected bike lanes, which will tie into the bike lanes to the west of Redwood Road. There would be no changes to the amount of on-street parking.

The project would remove a travel lane in the westbound direction.

Final Design – Plan View

1700 South Final Design Plan View

Final Design – Cross-Section View

As a comparison, below is a cross-section of the existing conditions.

Please note: if funding is not available for project implementation, then the existing layout will remain.

Existing Conditions – Cross-Section View


Contact Us

Si necesitas esta información en español, comunícate con la división de transporte.

Email | streetresurfacing@slcgov.com

Phone | 801-535-6630

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