Salt Lake City

Sustainability

Contact SLCgreen (801) 535-6470 | slcgreen@slcgov.com

What We’re Doing

What We’re Doing

Although climate change is considered a global crisis and impacts the security of the world’s nations, many of the natural resource, public health and infrastructure impacts associated with climate change are being addressed on a local community level.

Through a variety of efforts, including policy action, designing efficient buildings, implementing sustainable infrastructure, and managing alternative fuel fleets, Salt Lake City is working to plan for and mitigate the impacts of climate change on our community.

 Salt Lake City public safety building

 

Executive Orders & Ordinances

Comprehensive Energy Management Executive Order (View Document)

In 2015, the City enacted the Comprehensive Energy Management Executive Order to identify and require the implementation of energy management best practices for large facilities and buildings. Benchmarking of the energy consumption of all City facilities 3,000 square-feet or larger is required on an annual basis.

The Order addresses all aspects of City operations that require the use of electricity, natural gas or other energy resources in order to operate buildings, facilities or other fixed assets. Through implementation, Salt Lake City Corporation will reduce energy waste and better ensure the responsible use of City resources. By using less energy and simultaneously deploying clean, renewable energy resources the City will mitigate pollution associated with regional air quality issues and cross-cutting challenges such as climate change.

Sustainable Infrastructure Executive Order (View Document)

On January 12, 2017, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski signed the Sustainable Infrastructure Executive Order, calling for citywide collaboration on sustainability.

This Executive Order builds upon the City’s commitment to using resources wisely, including water, energy, and land. Every year the City invests $200 million in a wide range of capital improvement projects to update and improve infrastructure related to water, energy, lighting and other utilities, and transportation. Through this Executive Order, the Mayor has directed departments to coordinate with one another as City infrastructure projects are designed and implemented to ensure the City is prioritizing reduction in air and greenhouse gas emissions, reduction in resource use, and improving water quality.

Elevate Buildings Ordinance (View Document)

In August 2017, the Salt Lake City Council passed an ordinance proposed by Mayor Jackie Biskupski and the Sustainability Department aimed at cutting energy costs, improving local air quality, and reducing the city’s carbon footprint.

The Council approved the Energy Benchmarking & Transparency Ordinance, which is projected to save local buildings owners $15.8 million in annual energy costs and eliminate over 29 tons of criteria pollutants from Salt Lake City’s air each year. The market-based ordinance works by phasing-in new requirements for buildings over 25,000 square feet to “benchmark” or measure their energy usage annually. Visit the Elevate Buildings page to learn more.

Policy Actions

The City’s commitment is demonstrated through its policy-level initiatives, changes in day-to-day municipal operations, and current and ongoing resilience efforts.

  • Installed 488 kilowatts of solar capacity on city buildings and built a one megawatt solar farm on a historical landfill.

  • Project Skyline, in partnership with the City Energy Project, is working with large commercial building owners to track energy use and implement cost and energy-saving measures to reduce GHG emissions.

  • The City, in cooperation with the state transit agency, offers lower cost public transit passes (Hive Pass) for city residents.

  • The Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities’ co-gen facility produces almost 6 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year and reduces the City’s GHG emissions by 4,300 tons annually.

  • The City’s Division of Transportation has installed over 150 miles of bicycle lanes to reduce vehicle miles traveled.

  • The City’s Division of Streets and Sanitation has replaced 24 of 30 diesel fleet refuse packers with compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel vehicles and installed a municipal CNG fueling station. This is part of a much larger effort that has increased the City’s fleet of clean vehicles to over 15%.

Energy Efficiency in City Buildings

City LEED Standards

In 2006, Salt Lake City committed to trying to meet at least LEED Silver standards in all new City buildings and major renovation projects.  Read the 2006 Executive Order requiring the City to design to LEED silver standards or higher.

City County Building

The City has been upgrading lighting and building systems in the City-County Building since 2001.  As a result of these projects, the City has reduced this building’s electricity use by over 840,000 kwh per year.  The City has also upgraded insulation on the extensive network of steam pipes that provide heat for the City County Building, Main Library, and the Leonardo Science Center.  This upgrade will reduce heat loss, and reduce natural gas consumption in the City’s boiler plant.

Public Safety Building

In 2009, voters approved the construction of a new Public Safety Building. This building will be the first public safety building in the nation to approach net-zero status (it will generate as much energy as it uses) and will receive a minimum of LEED Platinum status. The project is expected to be completed by 2013.

Sorenson Unity Center

In 2006, the City began construction of the Sorenson Unity Center to provide services, programming and recreation facilities to the Glendale community.  In keeping with the City’s commitment to energy efficiency, the Unity Center includes a variety of energy efficient elements including enhanced use of windows and skylights for lighting, heat pump and gas assist technologies, low-e windows and a reflective roof.  In 2009, the City received LEED Silver status for the new Unity Center.  The City currently is pursuing a Silver rating for operation and maintenance of the Unity Center as a LEED-Existing Building.

Public Services Maintenance Facility

The new Public Services Maintenance Facility, completed in 2010, is LEED Silver standard certified and is expected to cut the Fleet and Street Divisions’ building energy consumption by more than 50%.

Parks Department Building

In May 2009, the City replaced the old tar/gravel built-up roof on the Parks Building with a new white membrane (cool) roof and better insulation.  The blue line below shows the monthly electricity used in the year leading up to the roof replacement.  In the year following the replacement (red line), we used 6% less electricity – largely associated with summer cooling.  This saved 22,000 kwh of electricity that year (and 12.2 tons of greenhouse gas emissions).  We used even less electricity the year after that – green line — (probably associated with the cool weather this spring).  On average, in the two years since we replaced the roof, the City has consumed 36,700 kwh less electricity per year, a 10% average reduction compared the year before roof replacement.

Traffic Signals & Streetlights

Over the past 8 years, Salt Lake City has converted all of the traffic signals to LED lights—saving more than 1,700,000 kwh and $100,000 per year. Replacing the 1,445 the yellow traffic lights alone will save a total of 76,730 kwh and $4,950 each year . In addition, Salt Lake City has begun a long-term program to convert all streetlights to high efficiency fixtures over the next 15 years. The city replaced 1439 standard 250 watt cobra-head style street lights with LED cobra-head style street lights in various locations throughout the city.

The annual savings in electricity are estimated at 587 kwh per light replaced. The City will save approximately $48 per year in maintenance per lamp replaced.  Replacement of 1,554 lights would result in saving 912,198 kwh per year and approximately $130,723 in electricity and operating and maintenance costs.

Renewable Energy Projects for City Buildings

Solar: Farm

The Salt Lake City Solar Farm began generating clean electricity in June 2014. The project includes roughly 3,000 solar panels spread across four acres just west of downtown Salt Lake City. The installation is the largest ever completed by Salt Lake City Corporation and its electricity is being credited to the Public Safety Building in order to achieve a Net Zero energy goal. The panels will produce over 1.2 million kilowatt-hours of electricity each year.

Solar: Public Safety Building

The roof of the Public Safety Building is covered by over 1,000 solar panels with a total capacity of 350 kilowatts. These panels complement a 30 kilowatt solar canopy that shades visitors entering the building and help the project achieve net zero energy status. In addition to providing power for daily operations, 30 percent of the rooftop solar panels have been wired to provide emergency electricity directly to the building in the event of a power blackout.

Solar: Plaza 349

Plaza 349 is home to a variety of municipal operations, including Engineering, Transportation and Technology. The work of these employees is now powered in part by clean, renewable energy thanks to a funding award from the Rocky Mountain Power Blue Sky program. The City used Blue Sky Community Project Funds to place 136 solar panels atop the roof of this recently renovated building. Explore this project’s real-time solar production data.

Solar: Hot Water Pilot Test

Salt Lake City is pilot testing the use of solar hot water in one of the City’s fire stations. Because fire stations use high volumes of hot water every day, significant energy can be saved by using the sun’s energy to heat the water instead of natural gas. In 2011, Salt Lake City installed its first solar hot water system on Fire Station #8, adjacent to the Spring Mobile Baseball Stadium on 1300 South. To date, the City has saved $574 in energy costs. See how the system is performing right now.

Turning Methane into Energy

Salt Lake City’s Public Utilities Department began capturing methane, a byproduct of wastewater treatment, at the City’s wastewater plant in 2005. This methane is used to power two large electrical generators, generating both electricity and heat needed to power treatment plant operations. Today, this co-gen facility produces almost 6 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year, reducing the City’s GHG emissions by 2,700 tons annually.

Reports

Clean Energy Implementation Plan (View PDF)

Salt Lake City and Rocky Mountain Power are committed to cooperatively seeking and implementing energy solutions that reduce emissions and align with community values of local residents and businesses. Mayor Jackie Biskupski and Rocky Mountain Power CEO Cindy Crane signed a Clean Energy Cooperation Statement in August 2016 detailing goals, timing and scope for this vision.

Read the full plan here.

 

Annual Municipal Benchmarking Report (View PDF)

In 2015, the City enacted the Comprehensive Energy Management Executive Order to identify and require the implementation of energy management best practices for large facilities and buildings. Benchmarking of the energy consumption of all City facilities 3,000 square-feet or larger is required on an annual basis. The Order addresses all aspects of City operations that require the use of electricity, natural gas or other energy resources in order to operate buildings, facilities or other fixed assets. Through implementation, Salt Lake City Corporation will reduce energy waste and better ensure the responsible use of City resources. By using less energy and simultaneously deploying clean, renewable energy resources the City will mitigate pollution associated with regional air quality issues and cross-cutting challenges such as climate change.

2015 Report here           2016 Report here